Diabetic Alert Dog- Linda Cree Interview

There are few people in the United States working with diabetic alert dog training.  Linda Cree of BFF Dog Training is an expert training dogs in Wisconsin for dog owners all over the United States.  She uses a system to train a diabetic alert dog to indicate to it’s owner when blood sugar has dipped too low or spiked too high.

Many people aren’t aware but dogs are able to smell the chemical changes that occur within the body of someone who is undergoing a diabetic emergency. Science has proven certain dogs can become part of a reliable health alert team (once dog & human are properly trained). Using her medical background and training with the nations best dog trainers and behaviorists she can find dogs with aptitude/desire to do diabetes work and connect them to humans with needs. This helps to ensure that their dogs can smell these chemical changes, recognize them for what they are, and indicate to the owner what is happening so that the owner can follow through with the proper medical protocol.

This type of training can be a life saver for a person that has diabetes.  Her system is unique, fun for the dog, and very specific for getting results that last.

 

Diabetic Alert Dog- The Interview

Listen in to the interview below to learn about diabetic alert dog training.

Diabetic Alert Dog- What You’ll Learn

Linda shares some fascinating information about her dog training in this interview.  Among what you’ll learn is:

  • What dog breeds can be trained to be diabetic alert dogs.
  • The type of temperament required and sociability needed in order for a dog to be trained for this task.
  • The ‘cheap’ labor that one can employ with their dog to get them to perform this job.
  • Whether or not an owner can get their own dog to be trained for this or whether they have to buy a dog that is already trained.
  • If these dogs can be trained to help children or if they are just trained for adults.
  • What rights a diabetic alert dog has and whether they get the same access to public areas that service dogs for the blind enjoy.
  • A ‘blueprint’ that Linda uses to teach each dog how to recognize the scent of someone who is in a diabetic emergency.
  • The unique and somewhat ‘gross’ way that Linda employs in order to capture the scent she needs to train her dogs.
  • What percentage of dogs is really cut out to do this kind of work.
  • The working lifespan that one could hope to get from their diabetic alert dog.

This has been one of our more unique interviews.  This style of training is truly heroic as these dogs work to keep their owners safe and healthy.